Environmental Justice Incommensurabilities Framework

Monitoring and evaluating environmental justice concepts, thought styles and human-environment relations

New paper is out!

Environmental justice concepts have undergone significant changes from being solely distributive to include underlying power asymmetries. Consequently, we are now faced with a wide array of different interpretations of what environmental justice is. This calls for a fundamental reflection on what environmental justice stands for, how and most importantly why it is used.

To achieve this goal, this paper elaborates on the genesis of environmental justice. Recurring challenges of environmental justice research and activism will be identified. Addressing those challenges, as well as breaking down environmental justice concepts into smaller patterns and Fleck’sian thought styles, the Environmental Justice Incommensurabilities Framework (EJIF) is introduced. This evaluation and monitoring tool encourages actors (and especially researchers) to reflect upon ideological positionings and axiological interpretations of human-environment relations as well as justice, making research on and with environmental justice more transparent and comparable.

Continue reading “Environmental Justice Incommensurabilities Framework”

Exploring values-based modes of production and consumption in the corporate food regime

FWF Young Independent Research Group

The current agricultural and food system is dominated by transnational corporations that are based on competition, economic growth and the maximization of profits. This corporate food regime is contested by social movements and producers, which are often locally based and aim for a more sustainable production based on values such as solidarity or trust. In our research project, we focus on those small- and mid-scale initiatives that we understand as values-based modes of production and consumption. Our two concrete examples are community supported agriculture (CSA) and regional food chains. We are interested in the question to what extend these small- and mid-scale bottom-up initiatives have the potential to change the corporate food regime (i.e. the dominant value chains in food production).

Continue reading “Exploring values-based modes of production and consumption in the corporate food regime”

New research approach presented: Values-Based Modes of Production and Consumption from theory to practice

Perspectives on Values-based Supply Chains. 29th Annual Conference of the Austrian Society of Agricultural Economics – and we were there!

Our team comprising Christina Plank (Political Sciences), Rike Stotten (Sociology), and Robert Hafner (Geography) presented our new research approach on values-based modes of production and consumption by applying it to Austrian CSA cases.

Thank you very much for having us – and the interesting questions afterwards!

Publication:

Stotten, R.; Plank, C.; Hafner, R. (2019): Wertebasierte Produktions- und Konsumweisen am Beispiel Solidarischer Landwirtschaft in Österreich. Perspectives on Values-based Supply Chains. 29th Annual Conference of the Austrian Society of Agricultural Economics.

Links:

Environmental Justice and Soy Agribusiness – Book is out!

Hafner, R. (2018): Environmental Justice and Soy Agribusiness. Earthscan Food and Agriculture Series.  London: Routledge. ISBN: 978-0-815-38535-6.

Environmental justice research and activism predominantly focus on openly conflictive situations; claims making is central. However, situations of injustice can still occur even if there is no overt conflict. Environmental Justice and Soy Agribusiness fills this gap by applying an environmental justice incommensurabilities framework to reveal the mechanisms of why conflicts do not arise in particular situations, even though they fall within classic environmental justice schemes.

Project with Indonesia: Cultural contexts of SDGs in a South-North-South perspective

Understanding cultural contexts of SDG implementations was at the core of two AGEF projects, financed by ASEA UNINET. In close cooperation with the Universitas Gadjah Mada in Yogyakarta and the Sebelas Maret University in Surakarta, local-regional implications of Sustainable Development Goals 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) and 15 (Life on Land) have been analysed and put in a South-North-South (South America – Europe – Indonesia) comparison. Continue reading “Project with Indonesia: Cultural contexts of SDGs in a South-North-South perspective”

AlpFoodway

Foodways are socioeconomic and cultural practices related to food production and consumption. Food heritage is a strong identity source for alpine populations. It goes beyond products to include productive landscapes and traditional knowledge on production techniques, consumption customs and rituals, and the transmission of ancient wisdom. Depopulation, ageing population and globalization put Alpine food heritage at risk of disappearing. The project will create a sustainable development model for peripheral mountain areas based on the preservation/valorization of Alpine Space cultural food heritage and on the adoption of innovative marketing and governance tools. It will also foster the emerging of a transnational alpine identity based on the common cultural values expressed in food heritage. Continue reading “AlpFoodway”

Podcast on environmental (in)justice, soy and incommensurabilities

The latest edition of the podcast “Zeit für Wissenschaft” (Time for Science) featured Robert Hafner and his work on environmental (in)justice, incommensurabilities of soy production in Argentina.

The podcast can be found here:

Hafner, Robert: “Soja”. Gespräch mit Melanie Bartos im Podcast “Zeit für Wissenschaft”, Universität Innsbruck, 2017. https://www.uibk.ac.at/podcast/zeit/sendungen/zfw036.html